Why choose Rocket.Chat for your open source chat tool
Jan24

Why choose Rocket.Chat for your open source chat tool

Created in 2015, Rocket.Chat is a fully open source and customizable communications platform designed for communities and organizations with high standards for data protection. Rocket.Chat enables communication through federation, and over 12 million people are using it for team chat, customer service, secure file sharing, and much more. Rocket.Chat is in many ways the world’s most comprehensive open source communications...

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7 strategies for success when contributing to open source
Jan24

7 strategies for success when contributing to open source

Many people aspire to become contributors to open source projects. With a little effort, anyone can. This article shares how I got started with open source contributions and how doing so helped me land a job in an open source organization. read more Powered by...

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How I use Linux accessibility settings
Jan23

How I use Linux accessibility settings

When I started using Linux in the 1990s, I was in my mid-40s and accessibility was not something I gave much thought to. Now, however, as I’m pushing 70, my needs have changed. A few years ago, I purchased a brand new Darter Pro from System76, and its default resolution is 1920×1080, and it’s high DPI, too. The system came with Pop_OS!, which I found that I had to modify to be able to see the icons and text on the...

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Our favorite Linux commands to use just for fun
Jan22

Our favorite Linux commands to use just for fun

In November, we shared the article 7 Linux commands to use just for fun and asked you to tell us what “for fun” Linux command you recommend—and why? Some Opensource.com contributors shared their favorites below. My favorites: read more Powered by...

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Make a video game with Bitsy
Jan21

Make a video game with Bitsy

There are many game design programs and many different possible approaches to game design, but for me, the one that stands out is Bitsy. Created by Adam Le Doux in 2017 and released under an MIT license, Bitsy is, in the words of its creator: “A little editor for little games or worlds. The goal is to make it easy to make games where you can walk around, talk to people, and be somewhere.” read more Powered by...

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What you need to know about fuzz testing and Go
Jan21

What you need to know about fuzz testing and Go

The usage of Go is growing rapidly. It is now the preferred language for writing cloud-native software, container software, command-line tools, databases, and more. Go has had built-in support for testing for quite some time now. It makes writing tests and running them using the Go tool relatively easy. read more Powered by...

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