3 things great open source leaders do
Apr16

3 things great open source leaders do

I’ve written a few articles on how to be do something badly (or how not to do things), as I think they’re a great way of adding a little humour to the process of presenting something. Some examples include: read more Powered by...

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5 reasons sysadmins love systemd
Apr15

5 reasons sysadmins love systemd

As systems administrators know, there’s a lot happening on modern computers. Applications run in the background, automated events wait to be triggered at a certain time, log files are written, status reports are delivered. Traditionally, these disparate processes have been managed and monitored with a collection of Unix tools to great effect and with great efficiency. However, modern computers are diverse, with local services...

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A beginner’s guide to load balancing
Apr15

A beginner’s guide to load balancing

When the personal computer was young, a household was likely to have one (or fewer) computers in it. Children played games on it during the day, and parents did accounting or programming or roamed through a BBS in the evening. Imagine a one-computer household today, though, and you can predict the conflict it would create. Everyone would want to use the computer at the same time, and there wouldn’t be enough keyboard and mouse...

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Resolve systemd-resolved name-service failures with Ansible
Apr15

Resolve systemd-resolved name-service failures with Ansible

Most people tend to take name services for granted. They are necessary to convert human-readable names, such as www.example.com, into IP addresses, like 93.184.216.34. It is easier for humans to recognize and remember names than IP addresses, and name services allow us to use names, and they also convert them to IP addresses for us. read more Powered by...

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3 essential Linux cheat sheets for productivity
Apr14

3 essential Linux cheat sheets for productivity

Linux is famous for its commands. This is partially because nearly everything that Linux does can also be invoked from a terminal, but it’s also that Linux as an operating system is highly modular. Its tools are designed to produce fairly specific results, and when you know a lot about a few commands, you can combine them in interesting ways for useful output. Learning Linux is equal parts learning commands and learning how to...

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4 tips for context switching in Git
Apr14

4 tips for context switching in Git

Anyone who spends a lot of time working with Git will eventually need to do some form of context switching. Sometimes this adds very little overhead to your workflow, but other times, it can be a real pain. Let’s discuss the pros and cons of some common strategies for dealing with context switching using this example problem: read more Powered by...

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